She was Kankakees History Lady
She was Kankakees History Lady
To a generation of Kankakee schoolchildren growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, Fannie Still was "the History Lady." She was the person who told them stories about people with names such as Noel LeVasseur or Sha-wa-na-see or Capt. Billy Gougar, and showed them the interesting and, sometimes, strange "treasures" stored away on the shelves of the Kankakee County Historical Society's Museum.

Still served as the curator from the day the museum opened its doors in October 1948, until her death in 1970. For her, being the curator wasn't just a job; it was a mission to gather and preserve as much of Kankakee County's history as she could, and to tell the story of the county to anyone who would listen. She almost never turned down an item offered for the museum's collection, or declined to conduct a tour or speak to a group.
To a generation of Kankakee schoolchildren growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, Fannie Still was "the History Lady." She was the person who told them stories about people with names such as Noel LeVasseur or Sha-wa-na-see or Capt. Billy Gougar, and showed them the interesting and, sometimes, strange "treasures" stored away on the shelves of the Kankakee County Historical Society's Museum.

Still served as the curator from the day the museum opened its doors in October 1948, until her death in 1970. For her, being the curator wasn't just a job; it was a mission to gather and preserve as much of Kankakee County's history as she could, and to tell the story of the county to anyone who would listen. She almost never turned down an item offered for the museum's collection, or declined to conduct a tour or speak to a group.
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         #60         137         1         She was Kankakee                                                                                   
She was Kankakees History Lady
She was Kankakees History Lady
To a generation of Kankakee schoolchildren growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, Fannie Still was "the History Lady." She was the person who told them stories about people with names such as Noel LeVasseur or Sha-wa-na-see or Capt. Billy Gougar, and showed them the interesting and, sometimes, strange "treasures" stored away on the shelves of the Kankakee County Historical Society's Museum.

Still served as the curator from the day the museum opened its doors in October 1948, until her death in 1970. For her, being the curator wasn't just a job; it was a mission to gather and preserve as much of Kankakee County's history as she could, and to tell the story of the county to anyone who would listen. She almost never turned down an item offered for the museum's collection, or declined to conduct a tour or speak to a group.
To a generation of Kankakee schoolchildren growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, Fannie Still was "the History Lady." She was the person who told them stories about people with names such as Noel LeVasseur or Sha-wa-na-see or Capt. Billy Gougar, and showed them the interesting and, sometimes, strange "treasures" stored away on the shelves of the Kankakee County Historical Society's Museum.

Still served as the curator from the day the museum opened its doors in October 1948, until her death in 1970. For her, being the curator wasn't just a job; it was a mission to gather and preserve as much of Kankakee County's history as she could, and to tell the story of the county to anyone who would listen. She almost never turned down an item offered for the museum's collection, or declined to conduct a tour or speak to a group.
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         #60         137         1         She was Kankakee                                                                                   
Rails across the river: Kankakee’s IC Bridges
Rails across the river: Kankakee’s IC Bridges
Want to see what is most likely the oldest man-made structure in the city of Kankakee? At the intersection of River Street and East Avenue, look at the section of stone wall that is part of the railroad embankment on the northwest corner. The large limestone blocks that form the wall were laid in place during the early summer of the year 1853, months before there was a city (or county) of Kankakee.

The stone, from a quarry several miles downstream near the mouth of Wiley Creek, was used to construct the piers and abutments for the first Illinois Central Railroad bridge across the Kankakee River. When the first steam engine arrived at the north bank of the river on July 4, 1853, it literally was at the end of the line: There was no bridge, yet. Nor was there any sign of a town; the earliest building to be erected — a general store owned by a man named Hicks Clark — was not completed until August.
Want to see what is most likely the oldest man-made structure in the city of Kankakee? At the intersection of River Street and East Avenue, look at the section of stone wall that is part of the railroad embankment on the northwest corner. The large limestone blocks that form the wall were laid in place during the early summer of the year 1853, months before there was a city (or county) of Kankakee.

The stone, from a quarry several miles downstream near the mouth of Wiley Creek, was used to construct the piers and abutments for the first Illinois Central Railroad bridge across the Kankakee River. When the first steam engine arrived at the north bank of the river on July 4, 1853, it literally was at the end of the line: There was no bridge, yet. Nor was there any sign of a town; the earliest building to be erected — a general store owned by a man named Hicks Clark — was not completed until August.
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         #46         71         3         Rails across the                                                          RR                       
Rails across the river: Kankakee’s IC Bridges
Rails across the river: Kankakee’s IC Bridges
Want to see what is most likely the oldest man-made structure in the city of Kankakee? At the intersection of River Street and East Avenue, look at the section of stone wall that is part of the railroad embankment on the northwest corner. The large limestone blocks that form the wall were laid in place during the early summer of the year 1853, months before there was a city (or county) of Kankakee.

The stone, from a quarry several miles downstream near the mouth of Wiley Creek, was used to construct the piers and abutments for the first Illinois Central Railroad bridge across the Kankakee River. When the first steam engine arrived at the north bank of the river on July 4, 1853, it literally was at the end of the line: There was no bridge, yet. Nor was there any sign of a town; the earliest building to be erected — a general store owned by a man named Hicks Clark — was not completed until August.
Want to see what is most likely the oldest man-made structure in the city of Kankakee? At the intersection of River Street and East Avenue, look at the section of stone wall that is part of the railroad embankment on the northwest corner. The large limestone blocks that form the wall were laid in place during the early summer of the year 1853, months before there was a city (or county) of Kankakee.

The stone, from a quarry several miles downstream near the mouth of Wiley Creek, was used to construct the piers and abutments for the first Illinois Central Railroad bridge across the Kankakee River. When the first steam engine arrived at the north bank of the river on July 4, 1853, it literally was at the end of the line: There was no bridge, yet. Nor was there any sign of a town; the earliest building to be erected — a general store owned by a man named Hicks Clark — was not completed until August.
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         #46         71         3         Rails across the                                                          RR                       
Kankakee's last stonecutters
Kankakee's last stonecutters
Dante Andreina and Tony Monacelli were the last of their kind in Kankakee County: men who used muscle, hand tools and years of experience to shape raw limestone into finished blocks for building. In the late 1940s and the 1950s, their Bourbonnais Stone Quarry was the area's only source of hand-cut building stone.

The use of cut stone from local quarries can be traced to the very beginning of Kankakee County. In 1853, stone blocks for the piers and abutments of the Illinois Central's bridge across the Kankakee River were cut and shaped at a quarry near Wiley Creek, a few miles downstream. The first Kankakee County Courthouse was built with locally quarried stone; so were a number of local church buildings that still are in use today.
Dante Andreina and Tony Monacelli were the last of their kind in Kankakee County: men who used muscle, hand tools and years of experience to shape raw limestone into finished blocks for building. In the late 1940s and the 1950s, their Bourbonnais Stone Quarry was the area's only source of hand-cut building stone.

The use of cut stone from local quarries can be traced to the very beginning of Kankakee County. In 1853, stone blocks for the piers and abutments of the Illinois Central's bridge across the Kankakee River were cut and shaped at a quarry near Wiley Creek, a few miles downstream. The first Kankakee County Courthouse was built with locally quarried stone; so were a number of local church buildings that still are in use today.
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         #83         260         3         Kankakee County                                                          RR                       
Kankakee's last stonecutters
Kankakee's last stonecutters
Dante Andreina and Tony Monacelli were the last of their kind in Kankakee County: men who used muscle, hand tools and years of experience to shape raw limestone into finished blocks for building. In the late 1940s and the 1950s, their Bourbonnais Stone Quarry was the area's only source of hand-cut building stone.

The use of cut stone from local quarries can be traced to the very beginning of Kankakee County. In 1853, stone blocks for the piers and abutments of the Illinois Central's bridge across the Kankakee River were cut and shaped at a quarry near Wiley Creek, a few miles downstream. The first Kankakee County Courthouse was built with locally quarried stone; so were a number of local church buildings that still are in use today.
Dante Andreina and Tony Monacelli were the last of their kind in Kankakee County: men who used muscle, hand tools and years of experience to shape raw limestone into finished blocks for building. In the late 1940s and the 1950s, their Bourbonnais Stone Quarry was the area's only source of hand-cut building stone.

The use of cut stone from local quarries can be traced to the very beginning of Kankakee County. In 1853, stone blocks for the piers and abutments of the Illinois Central's bridge across the Kankakee River were cut and shaped at a quarry near Wiley Creek, a few miles downstream. The first Kankakee County Courthouse was built with locally quarried stone; so were a number of local church buildings that still are in use today.
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         #83         260         3         Kankakee County                                                          RR                       
The wealthiest liveryman in Chicago came from Kankakee
The wealthiest liveryman in Chicago came from Kankakee
Sometime before 1860, young Leroy went into the livery business with a single horse and buggy. By 1865, the business had grown substantially; he erected a building on Dearborn Avenue, behind his parents' hotel, to house his livery and boarding stable. Payne and his wife, the former Clara Beebe, lived in an apartment above the stable until 1869. In that year, he sold the business to Henry C. McFall, and bought out the larger Muncey livery stable on Schuyler Avenue.

In 1871, the Great Chicago Fire devastated the city 60 miles north of Kankakee. As the burned city rebuilt, many young men — including Leroy Payne — flocked there to seek their fortunes. Within a decade, Payne had achieved success, operating a large livery business on Michigan Avenue, just south of Adams Street.
Sometime before 1860, young Leroy went into the livery business with a single horse and buggy. By 1865, the business had grown substantially; he erected a building on Dearborn Avenue, behind his parents' hotel, to house his livery and boarding stable. Payne and his wife, the former Clara Beebe, lived in an apartment above the stable until 1869. In that year, he sold the business to Henry C. McFall, and bought out the larger Muncey livery stable on Schuyler Avenue.

In 1871, the Great Chicago Fire devastated the city 60 miles north of Kankakee. As the burned city rebuilt, many young men — including Leroy Payne — flocked there to seek their fortunes. Within a decade, Payne had achieved success, operating a large livery business on Michigan Avenue, just south of Adams Street.
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The wealthiest liveryman in Chicago came from Kankakee
The wealthiest liveryman in Chicago came from Kankakee
Sometime before 1860, young Leroy went into the livery business with a single horse and buggy. By 1865, the business had grown substantially; he erected a building on Dearborn Avenue, behind his parents' hotel, to house his livery and boarding stable. Payne and his wife, the former Clara Beebe, lived in an apartment above the stable until 1869. In that year, he sold the business to Henry C. McFall, and bought out the larger Muncey livery stable on Schuyler Avenue.

In 1871, the Great Chicago Fire devastated the city 60 miles north of Kankakee. As the burned city rebuilt, many young men — including Leroy Payne — flocked there to seek their fortunes. Within a decade, Payne had achieved success, operating a large livery business on Michigan Avenue, just south of Adams Street.
Sometime before 1860, young Leroy went into the livery business with a single horse and buggy. By 1865, the business had grown substantially; he erected a building on Dearborn Avenue, behind his parents' hotel, to house his livery and boarding stable. Payne and his wife, the former Clara Beebe, lived in an apartment above the stable until 1869. In that year, he sold the business to Henry C. McFall, and bought out the larger Muncey livery stable on Schuyler Avenue.

In 1871, the Great Chicago Fire devastated the city 60 miles north of Kankakee. As the burned city rebuilt, many young men — including Leroy Payne — flocked there to seek their fortunes. Within a decade, Payne had achieved success, operating a large livery business on Michigan Avenue, just south of Adams Street.
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         #34         106         3         The wealthiest l                                                                                   
Demolishing the Court Street Bridge
Demolishing the Court Street Bridge
This "Court Street Bridge," as everyone called it at the time, carried vehicle and pedestrian traffic on the city's busiest street across the double-tracked main line of the Illinois Central Railroad. The arched bridge, sturdily constructed of local limestone, had opened in 1855, only two years after the IC tracks reached the townsite.

After 56 years of use, the bridge — stained with the smoke billowing from the stacks of hundreds of locomotives passing beneath it — was definitely showing its age. The city wanted the crumbling stone structure replaced for safety reasons. The railroad also wanted it torn down and rebuilt with a wider arch that would allow the number of tracks to be increased from two to four.
This "Court Street Bridge," as everyone called it at the time, carried vehicle and pedestrian traffic on the city's busiest street across the double-tracked main line of the Illinois Central Railroad. The arched bridge, sturdily constructed of local limestone, had opened in 1855, only two years after the IC tracks reached the townsite.

After 56 years of use, the bridge — stained with the smoke billowing from the stacks of hundreds of locomotives passing beneath it — was definitely showing its age. The city wanted the crumbling stone structure replaced for safety reasons. The railroad also wanted it torn down and rebuilt with a wider arch that would allow the number of tracks to be increased from two to four.
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Demolishing the Court Street Bridge
Demolishing the Court Street Bridge
This "Court Street Bridge," as everyone called it at the time, carried vehicle and pedestrian traffic on the city's busiest street across the double-tracked main line of the Illinois Central Railroad. The arched bridge, sturdily constructed of local limestone, had opened in 1855, only two years after the IC tracks reached the townsite.

After 56 years of use, the bridge — stained with the smoke billowing from the stacks of hundreds of locomotives passing beneath it — was definitely showing its age. The city wanted the crumbling stone structure replaced for safety reasons. The railroad also wanted it torn down and rebuilt with a wider arch that would allow the number of tracks to be increased from two to four.
This "Court Street Bridge," as everyone called it at the time, carried vehicle and pedestrian traffic on the city's busiest street across the double-tracked main line of the Illinois Central Railroad. The arched bridge, sturdily constructed of local limestone, had opened in 1855, only two years after the IC tracks reached the townsite.

After 56 years of use, the bridge — stained with the smoke billowing from the stacks of hundreds of locomotives passing beneath it — was definitely showing its age. The city wanted the crumbling stone structure replaced for safety reasons. The railroad also wanted it torn down and rebuilt with a wider arch that would allow the number of tracks to be increased from two to four.
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Flames destroy the Remington Theatre
Flames destroy the Remington Theatre
The quiet of the restaurant was shattered as a small boy rushed in, shouting that the Remington Theatre building was on fire. Remington told a newspaper reporter, "I immediately sprang for the door, ran toward Court Street, and to the alley leading to the playhouse."
The quiet of the restaurant was shattered as a small boy rushed in, shouting that the Remington Theatre building was on fire. Remington told a newspaper reporter, "I immediately sprang for the door, ran toward Court Street, and to the alley leading to the playhouse."
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Las llamas destruyen el Teatro Remington
Las llamas destruyen el Teatro Remington
 
 
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The 1885 blaze that nearly
destroyed Cabery
The 1885 blaze that nearly
destroyed Cabery
Normally, you wouldn't find a pedestrian on Main Street in Cabery at 3 a.m. on a Sunday. At that early hour on May 3, 1885, however, there was somebody "out and about" in the small town in Kankakee County's southwest corner. Luckily, that unnamed person noticed flames licking at the wooden wall of Mrs. Hilborne's millinery shop on the south side of Main Street. He raised the alarm, allowing the Hilbornes to escape unharmed from their second floor apartment.

Within minutes after the alarm was raised, the fire spread eastward along the line of downtown buildings, engulfing the structure housing K.B. Olson's General Store and the office of the Cabery newspaper, the Southwest Enquirer. On the second floor were the meeting rooms of the town's Masonic Lodge.
Normally, you wouldn't find a pedestrian on Main Street in Cabery at 3 a.m. on a Sunday. At that early hour on May 3, 1885, however, there was somebody "out and about" in the small town in Kankakee County's southwest corner. Luckily, that unnamed person noticed flames licking at the wooden wall of Mrs. Hilborne's millinery shop on the south side of Main Street. He raised the alarm, allowing the Hilbornes to escape unharmed from their second floor apartment.

Within minutes after the alarm was raised, the fire spread eastward along the line of downtown buildings, engulfing the structure housing K.B. Olson's General Store and the office of the Cabery newspaper, the Southwest Enquirer. On the second floor were the meeting rooms of the town's Masonic Lodge.
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The 1885 blaze that nearly
destroyed Cabery
The 1885 blaze that nearly
destroyed Cabery
Normally, you wouldn't find a pedestrian on Main Street in Cabery at 3 a.m. on a Sunday. At that early hour on May 3, 1885, however, there was somebody "out and about" in the small town in Kankakee County's southwest corner. Luckily, that unnamed person noticed flames licking at the wooden wall of Mrs. Hilborne's millinery shop on the south side of Main Street. He raised the alarm, allowing the Hilbornes to escape unharmed from their second floor apartment.

Within minutes after the alarm was raised, the fire spread eastward along the line of downtown buildings, engulfing the structure housing K.B. Olson's General Store and the office of the Cabery newspaper, the Southwest Enquirer. On the second floor were the meeting rooms of the town's Masonic Lodge.
Normally, you wouldn't find a pedestrian on Main Street in Cabery at 3 a.m. on a Sunday. At that early hour on May 3, 1885, however, there was somebody "out and about" in the small town in Kankakee County's southwest corner. Luckily, that unnamed person noticed flames licking at the wooden wall of Mrs. Hilborne's millinery shop on the south side of Main Street. He raised the alarm, allowing the Hilbornes to escape unharmed from their second floor apartment.

Within minutes after the alarm was raised, the fire spread eastward along the line of downtown buildings, engulfing the structure housing K.B. Olson's General Store and the office of the Cabery newspaper, the Southwest Enquirer. On the second floor were the meeting rooms of the town's Masonic Lodge.
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The day Crescent City blew up
The day Crescent City blew up
Suddenly, one of the cars derailed as it passed through the business district. Behind it, a string of tank cars filled with compressed propane gas left the tracks and overturned. Debris from the derailment caught fire, and at about 7:30 a.m., one of the propane tanks exploded in a huge fireball. Throughout the next several hours, five more of the 30,000-gallon tank cars would explode and burn, totally destroying 11 business buildings and 15 homes, damaging at least 50 other buildings, and injuring an estimated 70 people. Amazingly, no one was killed.

The devastation was incredible, forming a landscape of loose bricks, splintered wood, broken glass, blown-down and blackened trees, burned-out automobiles and huge pieces of steel from ruptured tank cars. Gov. Richard Ogilvie toured the wrecked town the day after the explosions. A World War II veteran, he said the scene reminded him of "towns I saw in France in 1944 and 1945 — it looks like a bomb hit the town."
Suddenly, one of the cars derailed as it passed through the business district. Behind it, a string of tank cars filled with compressed propane gas left the tracks and overturned. Debris from the derailment caught fire, and at about 7:30 a.m., one of the propane tanks exploded in a huge fireball. Throughout the next several hours, five more of the 30,000-gallon tank cars would explode and burn, totally destroying 11 business buildings and 15 homes, damaging at least 50 other buildings, and injuring an estimated 70 people. Amazingly, no one was killed.

The devastation was incredible, forming a landscape of loose bricks, splintered wood, broken glass, blown-down and blackened trees, burned-out automobiles and huge pieces of steel from ruptured tank cars. Gov. Richard Ogilvie toured the wrecked town the day after the explosions. A World War II veteran, he said the scene reminded him of "towns I saw in France in 1944 and 1945 — it looks like a bomb hit the town."
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         #51         171         2         The day Crescent                                                                                   
The day Crescent City blew up
The day Crescent City blew up
Suddenly, one of the cars derailed as it passed through the business district. Behind it, a string of tank cars filled with compressed propane gas left the tracks and overturned. Debris from the derailment caught fire, and at about 7:30 a.m., one of the propane tanks exploded in a huge fireball. Throughout the next several hours, five more of the 30,000-gallon tank cars would explode and burn, totally destroying 11 business buildings and 15 homes, damaging at least 50 other buildings, and injuring an estimated 70 people. Amazingly, no one was killed.

The devastation was incredible, forming a landscape of loose bricks, splintered wood, broken glass, blown-down and blackened trees, burned-out automobiles and huge pieces of steel from ruptured tank cars. Gov. Richard Ogilvie toured the wrecked town the day after the explosions. A World War II veteran, he said the scene reminded him of "towns I saw in France in 1944 and 1945 — it looks like a bomb hit the town."
Suddenly, one of the cars derailed as it passed through the business district. Behind it, a string of tank cars filled with compressed propane gas left the tracks and overturned. Debris from the derailment caught fire, and at about 7:30 a.m., one of the propane tanks exploded in a huge fireball. Throughout the next several hours, five more of the 30,000-gallon tank cars would explode and burn, totally destroying 11 business buildings and 15 homes, damaging at least 50 other buildings, and injuring an estimated 70 people. Amazingly, no one was killed.

The devastation was incredible, forming a landscape of loose bricks, splintered wood, broken glass, blown-down and blackened trees, burned-out automobiles and huge pieces of steel from ruptured tank cars. Gov. Richard Ogilvie toured the wrecked town the day after the explosions. A World War II veteran, he said the scene reminded him of "towns I saw in France in 1944 and 1945 — it looks like a bomb hit the town."
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         #51         171         2         The day Crescent                                                                                   
Kankakee County’s history finds a home
Kankakee County’s history finds a home
The Kankakee County Historical Society, founded in 1906, is one of the oldest historical societies in Illinois. For more than four decades after the society was formed, however, its collection of historical objects and records had no permanent home. For various periods between 1912 and 1948, the Historical Society's collection shuttled between temporary quarters in the city's high school building at Indiana Avenue and Station Street and the Kankakee County Courthouse.
The Kankakee County Historical Society, founded in 1906, is one of the oldest historical societies in Illinois. For more than four decades after the society was formed, however, its collection of historical objects and records had no permanent home. For various periods between 1912 and 1948, the Historical Society's collection shuttled between temporary quarters in the city's high school building at Indiana Avenue and Station Street and the Kankakee County Courthouse.
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         #92         260         2         Kankakee County                     S/E                                  RR                       
la historia del condado de Kankakee encuentra un hogar
la historia del condado de Kankakee encuentra un hogar
La Sociedad Histórica del Condado de Kankakee, fundada en 1906, es una de las más antiguas sociedades históricas en Illinois. Durante más de cuatro décadas después de que se formó la sociedad, sin embargo, su colección de objetos y documentos históricos no tenía un hogar permanente. Distin
La Sociedad Histórica del Condado de Kankakee, fundada en 1906, es una de las más antiguas sociedades históricas en Illinois. Durante más de cuatro décadas después de que se formó la sociedad, sin embargo, su colección de objetos y documentos históricos no tenía un hogar permanente. Distin
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The History of the Watseka Wonder
The History of the Watseka Wonder
The small town of Watseka, located in the northeastern corner of the state and just a few miles from the Indiana border, was just like any other midwestern farm town in the late 1800's. Little out of the ordinary occurred here --- until July 1877. It was in this month that what became known as the "Watseka Wonder" first came to prominence here.
The small town of Watseka, located in the northeastern corner of the state and just a few miles from the Indiana border, was just like any other midwestern farm town in the late 1800's. Little out of the ordinary occurred here --- until July 1877. It was in this month that what became known as the "Watseka Wonder" first came to prominence here.
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         #94         291         2         The History of t         5pg         S/E                                  RR                       
La Historia del Watseka Maravilla
La Historia del Watseka Maravilla
La ciudad pequeña de Watseka, localizado en la esquina nororiental del estatal y justo unas cuantas millas de la frontera de Indiana, era justo como cualquier otro midwestern ciudad de granja en el tardío 1800 es. Poco fuera del normal ocurrido aquí --- hasta que julio 1877. Sea en este mes que
La ciudad pequeña de Watseka, localizado en la esquina nororiental del estatal y justo unas cuantas millas de la frontera de Indiana, era justo como cualquier otro midwestern ciudad de granja en el tardío 1800 es. Poco fuera del normal ocurrido aquí --- hasta que julio 1877. Sea en este mes que
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He was known as 'The Birdman of Kankakee'
He was known as 'The Birdman of Kankakee'
To say Joseph H. Dodson loved birds was like observing that a politician is interested in getting elected. Dodson, for more than a quarter-century was the "Birdman of Kankakee," operating a bird sanctuary on the large grounds of his home at 701 S. Harrison Ave.

If that address seems familiar, you probably know Dodson's home as the B. Harley Bradley house, designed in 1900 by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Dodson purchased the house in 1915, when he retired from a career at the Chicago Board of Trade and moved to Kankakee.
To say Joseph H. Dodson loved birds was like observing that a politician is interested in getting elected. Dodson, for more than a quarter-century was the "Birdman of Kankakee," operating a bird sanctuary on the large grounds of his home at 701 S. Harrison Ave.

If that address seems familiar, you probably know Dodson's home as the B. Harley Bradley house, designed in 1900 by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Dodson purchased the house in 1915, when he retired from a career at the Chicago Board of Trade and moved to Kankakee.
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Era conocido como 'El Hombre Pájaro de Kankakee'
Era conocido como 'El Hombre Pájaro de Kankakee'
Decir Joseph H. Dodson amaba las aves era como la observación de que un político está interesado en ser elegido. Dodson, durante más de un cuarto de siglo fue el "El hombre de Kankakee," el funcionamiento de un santuario de aves en los grandes motivos de su casa en el 701 S. Harrison A
Decir Joseph H. Dodson amaba las aves era como la observación de que un político está interesado en ser elegido. Dodson, durante más de un cuarto de siglo fue el "El hombre de Kankakee," el funcionamiento de un santuario de aves en los grandes motivos de su casa en el 701 S. Harrison A
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Building the state hospital
Building the state hospital
For the first quarter-century of its existence, the hospital grew steadily in both physical facilities and patient population. The first patient was admitted on Dec. 4, 1879; by Jan. 1, 1880, the patient population was 33. The patient population had risen to 2,300 by 1903, with more than 700 people (including eight physicians) providing treatment and support services.
For the first quarter-century of its existence, the hospital grew steadily in both physical facilities and patient population. The first patient was admitted on Dec. 4, 1879; by Jan. 1, 1880, the patient population was 33. The patient population had risen to 2,300 by 1903, with more than 700 people (including eight physicians) providing treatment and support services.
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         #21         155         1         Building the sta                                                                                   
Building the state hospital
Building the state hospital
For the first quarter-century of its existence, the hospital grew steadily in both physical facilities and patient population. The first patient was admitted on Dec. 4, 1879; by Jan. 1, 1880, the patient population was 33. The patient population had risen to 2,300 by 1903, with more than 700 people (including eight physicians) providing treatment and support services.
For the first quarter-century of its existence, the hospital grew steadily in both physical facilities and patient population. The first patient was admitted on Dec. 4, 1879; by Jan. 1, 1880, the patient population was 33. The patient population had risen to 2,300 by 1903, with more than 700 people (including eight physicians) providing treatment and support services.
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         #21         155         1         Building the sta                                                                                   
How Kankakee landed hospital for the insane
How Kankakee landed hospital for the insane
Kankakee won the hospital project in a hotly contested and politically charged battle with eight other cities: Bloomington, Champaign, Charleston, Danville, Decatur, Paris, Paxton and Pontiac. The Kankakee facility would join three other state mental hospitals, located in the northern, southern and western sections of the state.

On May 25, 1877, the Illinois Legislature approved the building of a new hospital to serve the eastern part of the state. The legislation directed Gov. Shelby Cullom to appoint a group of seven commissioners who would choose a location for the new institution. Selection of the commissioners involved regional rivalries and other political considerations; the final makeup of that group could be vital in determining which town would be chosen.
Kankakee won the hospital project in a hotly contested and politically charged battle with eight other cities: Bloomington, Champaign, Charleston, Danville, Decatur, Paris, Paxton and Pontiac. The Kankakee facility would join three other state mental hospitals, located in the northern, southern and western sections of the state.

On May 25, 1877, the Illinois Legislature approved the building of a new hospital to serve the eastern part of the state. The legislation directed Gov. Shelby Cullom to appoint a group of seven commissioners who would choose a location for the new institution. Selection of the commissioners involved regional rivalries and other political considerations; the final makeup of that group could be vital in determining which town would be chosen.
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         #80         149         1         How Kankakee lan                                                                                   
How Kankakee landed hospital for the insane
How Kankakee landed hospital for the insane
Kankakee won the hospital project in a hotly contested and politically charged battle with eight other cities: Bloomington, Champaign, Charleston, Danville, Decatur, Paris, Paxton and Pontiac. The Kankakee facility would join three other state mental hospitals, located in the northern, southern and western sections of the state.

On May 25, 1877, the Illinois Legislature approved the building of a new hospital to serve the eastern part of the state. The legislation directed Gov. Shelby Cullom to appoint a group of seven commissioners who would choose a location for the new institution. Selection of the commissioners involved regional rivalries and other political considerations; the final makeup of that group could be vital in determining which town would be chosen.
Kankakee won the hospital project in a hotly contested and politically charged battle with eight other cities: Bloomington, Champaign, Charleston, Danville, Decatur, Paris, Paxton and Pontiac. The Kankakee facility would join three other state mental hospitals, located in the northern, southern and western sections of the state.

On May 25, 1877, the Illinois Legislature approved the building of a new hospital to serve the eastern part of the state. The legislation directed Gov. Shelby Cullom to appoint a group of seven commissioners who would choose a location for the new institution. Selection of the commissioners involved regional rivalries and other political considerations; the final makeup of that group could be vital in determining which town would be chosen.
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         #80         149         1         How Kankakee lan                                                                                   
Volkmann Building was the city’s tallest
Volkmann Building was the city’s tallest
Erected by the Volkmann family, whose jewelry business had been a Kankakee fixture since 1872, the building stood on the south side of Court Street, midway between Schuyler and Dearborn avenues. The Volkmann jewelry store occupied one-half of the new building's ground floor, and most of the offices on the seven upper floors were leased by physicians, dentists, attorneys and financial firms.
Erected by the Volkmann family, whose jewelry business had been a Kankakee fixture since 1872, the building stood on the south side of Court Street, midway between Schuyler and Dearborn avenues. The Volkmann jewelry store occupied one-half of the new building's ground floor, and most of the offices on the seven upper floors were leased by physicians, dentists, attorneys and financial firms.
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         #19         57         1         Volkmann Buildin                                                          RR                       
Volkmann Building was the city’s tallest
Volkmann Building was the city’s tallest
Erected by the Volkmann family, whose jewelry business had been a Kankakee fixture since 1872, the building stood on the south side of Court Street, midway between Schuyler and Dearborn avenues. The Volkmann jewelry store occupied one-half of the new building's ground floor, and most of the offices on the seven upper floors were leased by physicians, dentists, attorneys and financial firms.
Erected by the Volkmann family, whose jewelry business had been a Kankakee fixture since 1872, the building stood on the south side of Court Street, midway between Schuyler and Dearborn avenues. The Volkmann jewelry store occupied one-half of the new building's ground floor, and most of the offices on the seven upper floors were leased by physicians, dentists, attorneys and financial firms.
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         #19         57         1         Volkmann Buildin                                                          RR                       
The Kankakee River ice business
The Kankakee River ice business
The path of that block of ice to the customer's home began, usually in December or January, on a frozen river (the Kankakee particularly was noted for the clean, clear ice it produced). Teams of workers, armed with long handsaws, cut large blocks of ice from the river and loaded them onto horse-drawn sleds for transport to the storage facilities, called "icehouses." Inside the large icehouses, the blocks were stacked, separated by layers of insulating sawdust, to await the coming hot summer. Some of the ice was shipped by rail to out-of-town commercial customers, but most was delivered to local homes by wagons that followed a regular delivery route.
The path of that block of ice to the customer's home began, usually in December or January, on a frozen river (the Kankakee particularly was noted for the clean, clear ice it produced). Teams of workers, armed with long handsaws, cut large blocks of ice from the river and loaded them onto horse-drawn sleds for transport to the storage facilities, called "icehouses." Inside the large icehouses, the blocks were stacked, separated by layers of insulating sawdust, to await the coming hot summer. Some of the ice was shipped by rail to out-of-town commercial customers, but most was delivered to local homes by wagons that followed a regular delivery route.
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         #91         205         1         The Kankakee Riv                                                          RR                       
The Kankakee River ice business
The Kankakee River ice business
The path of that block of ice to the customer's home began, usually in December or January, on a frozen river (the Kankakee particularly was noted for the clean, clear ice it produced). Teams of workers, armed with long handsaws, cut large blocks of ice from the river and loaded them onto horse-drawn sleds for transport to the storage facilities, called "icehouses." Inside the large icehouses, the blocks were stacked, separated by layers of insulating sawdust, to await the coming hot summer. Some of the ice was shipped by rail to out-of-town commercial customers, but most was delivered to local homes by wagons that followed a regular delivery route.
The path of that block of ice to the customer's home began, usually in December or January, on a frozen river (the Kankakee particularly was noted for the clean, clear ice it produced). Teams of workers, armed with long handsaws, cut large blocks of ice from the river and loaded them onto horse-drawn sleds for transport to the storage facilities, called "icehouses." Inside the large icehouses, the blocks were stacked, separated by layers of insulating sawdust, to await the coming hot summer. Some of the ice was shipped by rail to out-of-town commercial customers, but most was delivered to local homes by wagons that followed a regular delivery route.
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         #91         205         1         The Kankakee Riv                                                          RR                       
The Divine Sarah visits Kankakee
The Divine Sarah visits Kankakee
She was an international superstar long before the days of television, the internet, blockbuster movies and music videos. One hundred years ago today, Sarah Bernhardt (universally referred to as "The Divine Sarah") appeared on the stage of Kankakee's Gaiety Theater for matinee and evening performances.
She was an international superstar long before the days of television, the internet, blockbuster movies and music videos. One hundred years ago today, Sarah Bernhardt (universally referred to as "The Divine Sarah") appeared on the stage of Kankakee's Gaiety Theater for matinee and evening performances.
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         #40         291         1         The Divine Sarah                                                                                   
The Divine Sarah visits Kankakee
The Divine Sarah visits Kankakee
She was an international superstar long before the days of television, the internet, blockbuster movies and music videos. One hundred years ago today, Sarah Bernhardt (universally referred to as "The Divine Sarah") appeared on the stage of Kankakee's Gaiety Theater for matinee and evening performances.
She was an international superstar long before the days of television, the internet, blockbuster movies and music videos. One hundred years ago today, Sarah Bernhardt (universally referred to as "The Divine Sarah") appeared on the stage of Kankakee's Gaiety Theater for matinee and evening performances.
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         #40         291         1         The Divine Sarah                                                                                   
Alpiner's local icon has been here since the 1880s
Alpiner's local icon has been here since the 1880s
More well-known locally as the Alpiner Cigar Store Indian, the colorful life-size metal statue is a featured exhibit today in the Kankakee County Museum. "Indian Chief No. 53" was the name of the statue that cigar maker Solomon Alpiner ordered from a New York wholesaler's catalog, probably in about 1876. The metal Indian was a replacement for a carved wooden statue that was destroyed, along with Alpiner's cigar store and factory, in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.
More well-known locally as the Alpiner Cigar Store Indian, the colorful life-size metal statue is a featured exhibit today in the Kankakee County Museum. "Indian Chief No. 53" was the name of the statue that cigar maker Solomon Alpiner ordered from a New York wholesaler's catalog, probably in about 1876. The metal Indian was a replacement for a carved wooden statue that was destroyed, along with Alpiner's cigar store and factory, in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.
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         #41         185         1         Alpiner's local                                                           RR                       
Alpiner's local icon has been here since the 1880s
Alpiner's local icon has been here since the 1880s
More well-known locally as the Alpiner Cigar Store Indian, the colorful life-size metal statue is a featured exhibit today in the Kankakee County Museum. "Indian Chief No. 53" was the name of the statue that cigar maker Solomon Alpiner ordered from a New York wholesaler's catalog, probably in about 1876. The metal Indian was a replacement for a carved wooden statue that was destroyed, along with Alpiner's cigar store and factory, in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.
More well-known locally as the Alpiner Cigar Store Indian, the colorful life-size metal statue is a featured exhibit today in the Kankakee County Museum. "Indian Chief No. 53" was the name of the statue that cigar maker Solomon Alpiner ordered from a New York wholesaler's catalog, probably in about 1876. The metal Indian was a replacement for a carved wooden statue that was destroyed, along with Alpiner's cigar store and factory, in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.
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         #41         185         1         Alpiner's local                                                           RR                       
The 'Hedge Apple' protected pioneer farmers' crops
The 'Hedge Apple' protected pioneer farmers' crops
What are those lumpy, green, softball-size objects that litter the parking lot north of the Kankakee County Museum in Small Memorial Park each fall?

Often referred to as "hedge apples," "horse apples" or "monkey balls," they actually are the fruit of the osage orange plant, which played an important role in Kankakee County's agricultural history.
What are those lumpy, green, softball-size objects that litter the parking lot north of the Kankakee County Museum in Small Memorial Park each fall?

Often referred to as "hedge apples," "horse apples" or "monkey balls," they actually are the fruit of the osage orange plant, which played an important role in Kankakee County's agricultural history.
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         #31         284         1         The 'Hedge Apple                                                                                   
The 'Hedge Apple' protected pioneer farmers' crops
The 'Hedge Apple' protected pioneer farmers' crops
What are those lumpy, green, softball-size objects that litter the parking lot north of the Kankakee County Museum in Small Memorial Park each fall?

Often referred to as "hedge apples," "horse apples" or "monkey balls," they actually are the fruit of the osage orange plant, which played an important role in Kankakee County's agricultural history.
What are those lumpy, green, softball-size objects that litter the parking lot north of the Kankakee County Museum in Small Memorial Park each fall?

Often referred to as "hedge apples," "horse apples" or "monkey balls," they actually are the fruit of the osage orange plant, which played an important role in Kankakee County's agricultural history.
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         #31         284         1         The 'Hedge Apple                                                                                   
Emergency Hospital was Kankakee’s first
Emergency Hospital was Kankakee’s first
On Tuesday, March 30, 1897, Mike Andrews achieved a place in Kankakee history (although he probably would have preferred to avoid that honor). Andrews was injured in an accident and rushed to Emergency Hospital for treatment. When admitted to the hospital and treated by Dr. G.H. Lee, Andrews became the first-ever hospital patient in Kankakee County's history.

Emergency Hospital, which had opened only two days earlier, was the community's first hospital. In those days, injuries and illnesses were dealt with at a physician's office or in the patient's home (doctors routinely made "house calls" to treat their patients).
On Tuesday, March 30, 1897, Mike Andrews achieved a place in Kankakee history (although he probably would have preferred to avoid that honor). Andrews was injured in an accident and rushed to Emergency Hospital for treatment. When admitted to the hospital and treated by Dr. G.H. Lee, Andrews became the first-ever hospital patient in Kankakee County's history.

Emergency Hospital, which had opened only two days earlier, was the community's first hospital. In those days, injuries and illnesses were dealt with at a physician's office or in the patient's home (doctors routinely made "house calls" to treat their patients).
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         #10         106         1         Emergency Hospit                     S/E                                  RR                       
Hospital de Emergencias fue el primero en Kankakee
Hospital de Emergencias fue el primero en Kankakee
El martes, 30 de marzo de 1897, Mike Andrews logró un lugar en la historia de Kankakee (aunque probablemente habría preferido evitar ese honor). Andrews resultó herido en un accidente y acudió al hospital de emergencia para recibir tratamiento. Cuando fue admitido en el hospital y tratado por el
El martes, 30 de marzo de 1897, Mike Andrews logró un lugar en la historia de Kankakee (aunque probablemente habría preferido evitar ese honor). Andrews resultó herido en un accidente y acudió al hospital de emergencia para recibir tratamiento. Cuando fue admitido en el hospital y tratado por el
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         #10         106         1         Emergency Hospit                     S/E                                  RR                       
Saying 'Bye-Bye' to the Old 'Y'
Saying 'Bye-Bye' to the Old 'Y'
Although the "Y" had been operating in Kankakee since 1894, the Harrison Avenue building was the first structure specifically built for the organization's needs. It offered meeting rooms, a gymnasium, a swimming pool and, for many years, clean and inexpensive sleeping rooms for men passing through town.

Previously, the organization had rented space in downtown buildings. Its first location was the third floor of the Swannell Building on the southeast corner of Court Street and Schuyler Avenue. In 1894, it took over the space and furnishings previously used by the defunct Columbian Social Club.
Although the "Y" had been operating in Kankakee since 1894, the Harrison Avenue building was the first structure specifically built for the organization's needs. It offered meeting rooms, a gymnasium, a swimming pool and, for many years, clean and inexpensive sleeping rooms for men passing through town.

Previously, the organization had rented space in downtown buildings. Its first location was the third floor of the Swannell Building on the southeast corner of Court Street and Schuyler Avenue. In 1894, it took over the space and furnishings previously used by the defunct Columbian Social Club.
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         #73         64         1         Saying 'Bye-Bye'                                                          RR                       
Saying 'Bye-Bye' to the Old 'Y'
Saying 'Bye-Bye' to the Old 'Y'
Although the "Y" had been operating in Kankakee since 1894, the Harrison Avenue building was the first structure specifically built for the organization's needs. It offered meeting rooms, a gymnasium, a swimming pool and, for many years, clean and inexpensive sleeping rooms for men passing through town.

Previously, the organization had rented space in downtown buildings. Its first location was the third floor of the Swannell Building on the southeast corner of Court Street and Schuyler Avenue. In 1894, it took over the space and furnishings previously used by the defunct Columbian Social Club.
Although the "Y" had been operating in Kankakee since 1894, the Harrison Avenue building was the first structure specifically built for the organization's needs. It offered meeting rooms, a gymnasium, a swimming pool and, for many years, clean and inexpensive sleeping rooms for men passing through town.

Previously, the organization had rented space in downtown buildings. Its first location was the third floor of the Swannell Building on the southeast corner of Court Street and Schuyler Avenue. In 1894, it took over the space and furnishings previously used by the defunct Columbian Social Club.
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         #73         64         1         Saying 'Bye-Bye'                                                          RR                       
When Hotel Riverview dominated Kankakee's landscape
When Hotel Riverview dominated Kankakee's landscape
The year is 1887. Imagine yourself aboard Capt. Billy Gougar's excursion boat Minnie Lillie, pulling away from its dock at the foot of Schuyler Avenue. As you head upstream on the Kankakee River, your eye is drawn to a bright pennant fluttering above a tall building in a grove of trees one-half mile ahead.

As you draw closer, more details emerge: the pennant is on the roof of a hexagonal tower rising above a 4-story, rustic-style structure. Broad porches stretch along the sides of the building facing the river; acres of manicured lawns and bright flower beds surround it.
The year is 1887. Imagine yourself aboard Capt. Billy Gougar's excursion boat Minnie Lillie, pulling away from its dock at the foot of Schuyler Avenue. As you head upstream on the Kankakee River, your eye is drawn to a bright pennant fluttering above a tall building in a grove of trees one-half mile ahead.

As you draw closer, more details emerge: the pennant is on the roof of a hexagonal tower rising above a 4-story, rustic-style structure. Broad porches stretch along the sides of the building facing the river; acres of manicured lawns and bright flower beds surround it.
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         #12         284         1         When Hotel River                                                                                   
When Hotel Riverview dominated Kankakee's landscape
When Hotel Riverview dominated Kankakee's landscape
The year is 1887. Imagine yourself aboard Capt. Billy Gougar's excursion boat Minnie Lillie, pulling away from its dock at the foot of Schuyler Avenue. As you head upstream on the Kankakee River, your eye is drawn to a bright pennant fluttering above a tall building in a grove of trees one-half mile ahead.

As you draw closer, more details emerge: the pennant is on the roof of a hexagonal tower rising above a 4-story, rustic-style structure. Broad porches stretch along the sides of the building facing the river; acres of manicured lawns and bright flower beds surround it.
The year is 1887. Imagine yourself aboard Capt. Billy Gougar's excursion boat Minnie Lillie, pulling away from its dock at the foot of Schuyler Avenue. As you head upstream on the Kankakee River, your eye is drawn to a bright pennant fluttering above a tall building in a grove of trees one-half mile ahead.

As you draw closer, more details emerge: the pennant is on the roof of a hexagonal tower rising above a 4-story, rustic-style structure. Broad porches stretch along the sides of the building facing the river; acres of manicured lawns and bright flower beds surround it.
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         #12         284         1         When Hotel River                                                                                   
Kankakee's 'Main Street' that disappeared
Kankakee's 'Main Street' that disappeared
While many communities named their major thoroughfare "Main Street," Kankakee's original commercial center carried the more prosaic title of East Avenue. From the mid-1850s to the early 1900s, the east side of the two blocks between Court and Station streets was lined with the town's most important stores, hotels and offices.

In the late 1960s, those two blocks were cleared of structures and became parking lots as part of a downtown redevelopment project. Today, the northern half of the site is occupied by the Miner Festival Square and fountain in front of the Kankakee train depot. A short stretch of East Avenue pavement still exists for one-half block north from Station Street.
While many communities named their major thoroughfare "Main Street," Kankakee's original commercial center carried the more prosaic title of East Avenue. From the mid-1850s to the early 1900s, the east side of the two blocks between Court and Station streets was lined with the town's most important stores, hotels and offices.

In the late 1960s, those two blocks were cleared of structures and became parking lots as part of a downtown redevelopment project. Today, the northern half of the site is occupied by the Miner Festival Square and fountain in front of the Kankakee train depot. A short stretch of East Avenue pavement still exists for one-half block north from Station Street.
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         #11         275         1         Kankakee's 'Main                                                          RR                       
Kankakee's 'Main Street' that disappeared
Kankakee's 'Main Street' that disappeared
While many communities named their major thoroughfare "Main Street," Kankakee's original commercial center carried the more prosaic title of East Avenue. From the mid-1850s to the early 1900s, the east side of the two blocks between Court and Station streets was lined with the town's most important stores, hotels and offices.

In the late 1960s, those two blocks were cleared of structures and became parking lots as part of a downtown redevelopment project. Today, the northern half of the site is occupied by the Miner Festival Square and fountain in front of the Kankakee train depot. A short stretch of East Avenue pavement still exists for one-half block north from Station Street.
While many communities named their major thoroughfare "Main Street," Kankakee's original commercial center carried the more prosaic title of East Avenue. From the mid-1850s to the early 1900s, the east side of the two blocks between Court and Station streets was lined with the town's most important stores, hotels and offices.

In the late 1960s, those two blocks were cleared of structures and became parking lots as part of a downtown redevelopment project. Today, the northern half of the site is occupied by the Miner Festival Square and fountain in front of the Kankakee train depot. A short stretch of East Avenue pavement still exists for one-half block north from Station Street.
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         #11         275         1         Kankakee's 'Main                                                          RR                       
The Great Flood of 1957
The Great Flood of 1957
The flood centered on Soldier Creek, a normally placid and shallow waterway that runs diagonally across the city from northeast to southwest. The creek crosses Illinois Route 50 north of the Armstrong floor tile plant, then proceeds west until turning south just before it reaches Schuyler Avenue. It parallels Schuyler, passing beneath two railroad embankments, to a point just south of Mulberry Street. The waterway then angles southwest, flowing through a viaduct under the Illinois Central Railroad tracks near Locust Street. From that point until it reaches Washington Park (at the northeast corner of Entrance Avenue and Chestnut Street), the creek runs underground through a man-made tunnel. West of Entrance, it emerges for a final three-block stretch, emptying into the Kankakee River just north of the Court Street bridge.
The flood centered on Soldier Creek, a normally placid and shallow waterway that runs diagonally across the city from northeast to southwest. The creek crosses Illinois Route 50 north of the Armstrong floor tile plant, then proceeds west until turning south just before it reaches Schuyler Avenue. It parallels Schuyler, passing beneath two railroad embankments, to a point just south of Mulberry Street. The waterway then angles southwest, flowing through a viaduct under the Illinois Central Railroad tracks near Locust Street. From that point until it reaches Washington Park (at the northeast corner of Entrance Avenue and Chestnut Street), the creek runs underground through a man-made tunnel. West of Entrance, it emerges for a final three-block stretch, emptying into the Kankakee River just north of the Court Street bridge.
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         #50         127         1         The Great Flood                                                           RR                       
The Great Flood of 1957
The Great Flood of 1957
The flood centered on Soldier Creek, a normally placid and shallow waterway that runs diagonally across the city from northeast to southwest. The creek crosses Illinois Route 50 north of the Armstrong floor tile plant, then proceeds west until turning south just before it reaches Schuyler Avenue. It parallels Schuyler, passing beneath two railroad embankments, to a point just south of Mulberry Street. The waterway then angles southwest, flowing through a viaduct under the Illinois Central Railroad tracks near Locust Street. From that point until it reaches Washington Park (at the northeast corner of Entrance Avenue and Chestnut Street), the creek runs underground through a man-made tunnel. West of Entrance, it emerges for a final three-block stretch, emptying into the Kankakee River just north of the Court Street bridge.
The flood centered on Soldier Creek, a normally placid and shallow waterway that runs diagonally across the city from northeast to southwest. The creek crosses Illinois Route 50 north of the Armstrong floor tile plant, then proceeds west until turning south just before it reaches Schuyler Avenue. It parallels Schuyler, passing beneath two railroad embankments, to a point just south of Mulberry Street. The waterway then angles southwest, flowing through a viaduct under the Illinois Central Railroad tracks near Locust Street. From that point until it reaches Washington Park (at the northeast corner of Entrance Avenue and Chestnut Street), the creek runs underground through a man-made tunnel. West of Entrance, it emerges for a final three-block stretch, emptying into the Kankakee River just north of the Court Street bridge.
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         #50         127         1         The Great Flood                                                           RR                       
A creek called 'Soldier'
A creek called 'Soldier'
Why is the small stream that empties into the Kankakee River just north of the Court Street bridge known as Soldier Creek?A clue to the origin of the name is a granite boulder located at Bridge Street and Ninth Avenue, a short distance from the mouth of the creek. The stone bears this message etched in capital letters: "SITE OF ANCIENT INDIAN VILLAGE."
Why is the small stream that empties into the Kankakee River just north of the Court Street bridge known as Soldier Creek?A clue to the origin of the name is a granite boulder located at Bridge Street and Ninth Avenue, a short distance from the mouth of the creek. The stone bears this message etched in capital letters: "SITE OF ANCIENT INDIAN VILLAGE."
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         #99         225         1         A creek called '                     S/E                                  RR                       
Un arroyo llamado 'Soldier'
Un arroyo llamado 'Soldier'
¿Por qué la pequeña corriente que desemboca en el río Kankakee justo al norte del puente de la calle Court es conocido como Soldier Creek? Una pista al origen del nombre es un canto rodado de granito situado en la calle Birch y la avenida ninth, una distancia corta de la boca del arroyo. La pie
¿Por qué la pequeña corriente que desemboca en el río Kankakee justo al norte del puente de la calle Court es conocido como Soldier Creek? Una pista al origen del nombre es un canto rodado de granito situado en la calle Birch y la avenida ninth, una distancia corta de la boca del arroyo. La pie
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         #99         225         1         A creek called '                     S/E                                  RR                       
Yesteryear: Gracious dining in Kankakee
Yesteryear: Gracious dining in Kankakee
In 1952, former Navy cooks Marvin Hammack and Ray Schimel were running a successful restaurant in Michigan called the Holiday House. The following year, they relocated to Kankakee, where they opened a restaurant that would be known for more than 30 years as Yesteryear.
In 1952, former Navy cooks Marvin Hammack and Ray Schimel were running a successful restaurant in Michigan called the Holiday House. The following year, they relocated to Kankakee, where they opened a restaurant that would be known for more than 30 years as Yesteryear.
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         #95         247         1         Yesteryear: Grac                     S/E                                  RR                       
Yesteryear: Cena en Kankakee
Yesteryear: Cena en Kankakee
En 1952, los antiguos cocineros de la Armada Marvin Hammack y Ray Schimel dirigían un exitoso restaurante en Michigan llamado Holiday House. Al año siguiente, se trasladaron a Kankakee, donde abrió un restaurante que sería conocido por más de 30 años como Yesteryear.
En 1952, los antiguos cocineros de la Armada Marvin Hammack y Ray Schimel dirigían un exitoso restaurante en Michigan llamado Holiday House. Al año siguiente, se trasladaron a Kankakee, donde abrió un restaurante que sería conocido por más de 30 años como Yesteryear.
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         #95         247         1         Yesteryear: Grac                     S/E                                  RR                       
The history of the Kankakee County Fair
The history of the Kankakee County Fair
The first fair in the then-new county of Kankakee was held in the late summer of 1856. The event was located in a grove of trees south of River Street and east of Harrison Avenue, known as "Cobb's Woods." A temporary board fence was erected to enclose the grounds, and an admission fee of 25 cents was collected from each visitor.

Only one cash premium was paid to an exhibitor at this fair: $5 was awarded for the best sample of wheat (although no record of the winner's name has survived). Paper certificates, or "diplomas" were awarded in most other categories. One winner was Mrs. Helen Paddock, for the best roll of butter; another was Mrs. Anna Warner, for her sewing entry, a suit of clothes for a boy. A highlight of the fair was an exhibition by Bourbonnais horseman Seymour Delonais, driving his trotting horse, Blackbird.
The first fair in the then-new county of Kankakee was held in the late summer of 1856. The event was located in a grove of trees south of River Street and east of Harrison Avenue, known as "Cobb's Woods." A temporary board fence was erected to enclose the grounds, and an admission fee of 25 cents was collected from each visitor.

Only one cash premium was paid to an exhibitor at this fair: $5 was awarded for the best sample of wheat (although no record of the winner's name has survived). Paper certificates, or "diplomas" were awarded in most other categories. One winner was Mrs. Helen Paddock, for the best roll of butter; another was Mrs. Anna Warner, for her sewing entry, a suit of clothes for a boy. A highlight of the fair was an exhibition by Bourbonnais horseman Seymour Delonais, driving his trotting horse, Blackbird.
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         #54         211         1         The history of t                                                          RR                       
The history of the Kankakee County Fair
The history of the Kankakee County Fair
The first fair in the then-new county of Kankakee was held in the late summer of 1856. The event was located in a grove of trees south of River Street and east of Harrison Avenue, known as "Cobb's Woods." A temporary board fence was erected to enclose the grounds, and an admission fee of 25 cents was collected from each visitor.

Only one cash premium was paid to an exhibitor at this fair: $5 was awarded for the best sample of wheat (although no record of the winner's name has survived). Paper certificates, or "diplomas" were awarded in most other categories. One winner was Mrs. Helen Paddock, for the best roll of butter; another was Mrs. Anna Warner, for her sewing entry, a suit of clothes for a boy. A highlight of the fair was an exhibition by Bourbonnais horseman Seymour Delonais, driving his trotting horse, Blackbird.
The first fair in the then-new county of Kankakee was held in the late summer of 1856. The event was located in a grove of trees south of River Street and east of Harrison Avenue, known as "Cobb's Woods." A temporary board fence was erected to enclose the grounds, and an admission fee of 25 cents was collected from each visitor.

Only one cash premium was paid to an exhibitor at this fair: $5 was awarded for the best sample of wheat (although no record of the winner's name has survived). Paper certificates, or "diplomas" were awarded in most other categories. One winner was Mrs. Helen Paddock, for the best roll of butter; another was Mrs. Anna Warner, for her sewing entry, a suit of clothes for a boy. A highlight of the fair was an exhibition by Bourbonnais horseman Seymour Delonais, driving his trotting horse, Blackbird.
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